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The Nitsch Museum in Mistelbach, Austria, presented the comprehensive retrospective “SINNE UND SEIN” on the occasion of the 75th birthday of Austrian painter and Action artist Hermann Nitsch. In keeping with Hermann Nitsch’s credo that his work should be a school of life, perception, and sensation, to be experienced with all five senses, “HERMANN NITSCH:SINNE UND SEIN” was the first comprehensive retrospective on the artist to employ interactive methods and the deliberate activation of all five senses. Tim Schmelzer’s contribution involved projecting an image of one of Hermann Nitsch’s most important poured paintings from the 1960s above the museum dedicated to his work. When passing through the large-scale projection, visitors were immersed in Hermann Nitsch’s Blutorgelbild.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer)
The Radio Ö1 scholarship for visual arts takes place in diffenent locations each year. This award was presented an the exhibition space for the young art of the “Bank Austria Kunstforum Vienna”. For this event Tim Schmelzer presented a collage of different street art subjects.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer)
An untitled Keith Haring painting from 1989 was graphically enhanced and projected onto Albertina’s mirrored colonnade as a natural vista. Visitors feel like they are walking through the artwork. Multiple mirrors enhanced the depth and dynamism of this light projection.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer)
The following art paintings were chosen for the light projection in the festibule hall: Pablo Picasso – Woman in a Green Hat, 1947; Pablo Picasso – Nude Seated in a Chair, 1963; Kees Van Dongen – Woman with Blue Eyes, 1908; Alexej von Jawlensky – Young Girl in a Flowered Hat, 1910; Natalia Goncharova – The Peacock, 1912; Hans Hofmann – Untitled, 1938; Lyubov Popova – Untitled, 1918.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer)
“Great Piece of Turf” by Albrecht Dürer, one of the best known still lives in art history, is part of the Albertina’s Graphic Collection. The painting was created at Dürer's workshop in Nuremberg in 1503. It is a study of a seemingly random group of wild plants, including dandelion and greater plantain. The work is considered one of the masterpieces of Dürer's realistic nature studies. This watercolor was graphically enhanced and projected onto Albertina’s mirrored colonnade as a natural vista. Visitors feel like they are walking through the artwork. Multiple mirrors enhanced the depth and dynamism of this light projection.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer )
Throughout the year, an extensive program of cultural activities and events takes place in the courtyards, ranging from readings to film festivals, dance performances, and exhibition and sculpture projects. Therefore Tim Schmelzer has presented further works frequently at the cultural events such as “Sommer im MQ” and “Winterzeit”.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer ) 
The following art paintings were chosen for the light projection in the main hall:Nathan Altman – Anna Achmatowa, 1915; Petrow-Wodkin - phantasie, 1925; Chagall – Roter Jude, 1915; Chagall – Spaziergang, 1918; Chagall – Selbstportrait, 1913; Chagall – Braut, 1911; Malewitsch – Mädchen im Feld, 1930; Malewitsch – Rote Kavallerie, 1928.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer )
The self portraiaid of Ivan Vasilyevich Klyun, an Russian painter and avant-garde artist, from 1913 was graphically enhanced and projected onto Albertina’s mirrored colonnade as a natural vista. Visitors feel like they are walking through the artwork. Multiple mirrors enhanced the depth and dynamism of this light projection.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer )
As one of the oldest museums of its kind, the Technisches Museum Wien looks back on more than 100 years of history. For its 100th anniversary in June 2009 the technical museum in Vienna opened non-stop for 100 hours. For four nights the museum illuminated the entire front of institution. Therefore Tim Schmelzer designed a projection subject. The large scale panorama on the building enabled a look inside the museum through virtually peeling off the façade.(Implementation by Lichttapete/Tim Schmelzer)